The Baby Boomer Generation: trends, research, comment and discussion of the generation from 1946 - 1964. Includes bulletin boards, Sixties and Seventies music, culture, health and coverage of issues for Baby Boomers
   

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The Baby Boomer Generation: trends, research, comment and discussion of the generation from 1946 - 1964. Includes bulletin boards, Sixties and Seventies music, culture, health and coverage of issues for Boomers

The Baby Boomer Generation is a source for trends, research, comment and discussion of and by people born from 1946 - 1964.

Covering issues on the Boomer Generation including original content for Boomers, bulletin boards, user comments, Sixties and Seventies music, Baby Boomer culture, health and coverage of issues for "Aging Hipsters."
August 21, 2005

Can Boomers Still Get Jobs?

We're the ones who said never trust anyone over 30 and we're the ones who now may face age bias in the workplace. This article from the Society for Human Resources Management takes a look at what may be becoming the most challenging 'diversity isssue' in the workplace. And, if anyone pays attention, perhaps we'll stop being downsized for being gray-haired.

On May 5, Jonathan A. Segal, a partner with the Philadelphia-based law firm of Wolf, Block, Schorr and Solis-Cohen spoke to employees of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) about the challenges of preventing age discrimination.

Segal said he can't understand why any employer would discriminate against an applicant or employee on the basis of age, because "older workers have a wealth of knowledge and experience that should be invaluable to any organization." Discrimination in any form is wrong, he said, and to severely limit your access to a productive, knowledgeable and skilled sector of the workforce because of age bias is plain foolish--especially in a tight labor market. Segal pointed to labor market estimates that show U.S. employers will face a shortage ranging from 800,000 to 3.3 million workers by 2010.

Nevertheless, Segal said many employers are clearly guilty of what he called the 'Dracula complex.'

"They want newer and fresher blood, because they're under the mistaken impression that it can bring vitality to an organization," he said. "However, experience and research show us that vitality, productivity and creativity are not age-related at all."

Experienced, knowledgable, and out of work? Search for positions worthy of an elder sage at
CareerBuilder.




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